How to respond to endorsements you get

May 6th, 2013 | by Jason Alba |

I got this email from someone on a webinar I recently did:

I often get emails saying that someone I know has endorsed me for a particular skill (the boxes, not a written recommendation).  I’ve wondered if there is etiquette for this situation.  I assume that if you want to use it as a way to connect with that person you have a perfect opening.  If not, should you say thanks?  Honestly, in many cases it isn’t really a meaningful endorsement.

I just delete them.

I don’t think anyone expects a thank you.  It is so easy to give endorsements… and I think you are right: “it isn’t really a meaningful endorsement.”

You are also right with this: “I assume that if you want to use it as a way to connect with that person you have a perfect opening.”

So yeah, if you want to use it as an opportunity to further a relationship, respond.  Otherwise delete the email notification from LinkedIn.

I don’t think you’ll burn bridges.

It is quite different, though, with Recommendations.

  1. 4 Responses to “How to respond to endorsements you get”

  2. By Nate Long on May 6, 2013 | Reply

    I totally agree. Endorsements shouldn’t necessarily warrant a thank-you; maybe a return endorsement, if the recipient is deserving of it anyway. Recommendations, as you mentioned, are an entirely different story, and deserve a personal response (including thanks) every time.

  3. By Mordechai (Morty) Schiller on Oct 23, 2013 | Reply

    Jason,
    Do you still feel this way?
    Endorsements are LI’s version of Facebook’s “Like” or Google+’s “+1″ buttons.
    I find I’m getting a lot of endorsements — mostly from people who would never take the mental bandwidth to write a recommendation.
    Giving an endorsement is quick and painless. But that doesn’t make it less sincere.
    On a more pragmatic level, do endorsements have any effect on ranking in LI?
    Morty

  4. By Jason Alba on Oct 23, 2013 | Reply

    Yep, still feel the same way. I feel like endorsements are a tool to get more traffic and “time on site” for LinkedIn to show to their investors. I still think this is a ridiculous addition to LI, and many have said it is meaningless and says nothing about the person’s skills.

    I don’t know if it has an effect on the ranking (or, search engine order/results)… when it does, it will be a game changer, but it will be so exploited and “gamed” that it will be a mess. My simple prediction. I wouldn’t put it past LI to go that direction.

  5. By Mordechai (Morty) Schiller on Oct 23, 2013 | Reply

    Sigh…

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