Advanced LinkedIn Searching with Google (!!)

September 21st, 2012 | by Jason Alba |

Tuesday I blogged about Irina Shamaeva’s post about how to see a full Profile of a 3rd degree contact.

In that post she links to an example search.  This search is actually on GOOGLE, not on LinkedIn.  I want to break it down and explain what she’s doing.  This is useful to anyone who searches on the Internet, and has applicability outside of recruiting or even looking for individuals.

Her example link goes to Google with these search criteria:

site:www.linkedin.com/in OR site:www.linkedin.com/pub -pub.dir “accountant at” CPA kpmg OR deloitte “location * Dallas/Fort Worth Area”

What the heck does any of this mean? Let’s walk through it:

1. site:www.linkedin.com/in OR site:www.linkedin.com/pub

This is telling Google that you only want results from that particular site.  She is saying to send results that are in the /in directory, OR the /pub directory.

You can do something similar… for example, let’s say you want to use Google to search JibberJobber for information about branding.  You would do this (in Google):

site:www.jibberjobber.com branding

Site searching is very useful.

2. -pub.dir

she is saying DO NOT return anything from the pub.dir area — honestly, I don’t know what this is for sure, but I think it’s saying don’t return any file (like html file) unless it is in a subdirectory of the pub folder.

3.  “accountant at”

Exact phrase… you should know putting something in quotes is for the exact phrase.

4.  CPA kpmg OR deloitte

Google actually treats this like CPA OR kpmg OR deloitte (since there is not an AND and it’s not in quotes).  It’s simply a string of characters.

5. “location * Dallas/Fort Worth Area”

This is searching on the actual words… Google isn’t tying into the map here.  So, if the words location and Dallas/Fort Worth Area are in the profile, it will be a positive hit.

The * is just a wildcard… which means something like this:

“location _________________________ Dallas/Fort Worth Area”

Where anything can be in the blank space. I’m guessing she does that because she uses the quotes for an exact phrase, but wants to leave that spot open for stuff LinkedIn might put in there.

Again, this is a search on GOOGLE, not on LinkedIn.  Try it here. More info on searching on Google at these pages.

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